Tag Archive | "lawn service"

Pine Straw Mulch Advantages


As the name implies, pine straw comes from pine trees, which shed their needles throughout the year. Once the needles drop to the ground, they are hand-raked, cleaned and baled without the need to cut down or harm the trees. This makes pine straw a very environmentally friendly choice for a landscaping and mulching material.

When applied correctly, pine straw prevents evaporation of water from the soil, reduces the growth of weeds, and helps to prevent soil compaction and erosion. Pine straw also protects plants from freezing conditions, helping keep the soil around the plants at a stable temperature. This is important for newer plants and those with shallow root systems. Plus, pine straw will improve the soil structure as it decays.

Types of pine straw can vary by region, and coverage will depend on the type, bale size, and application depth.

Some key advantages of pine straw mulch during their first year application:

  • Never leaves dirty residue or unpleasant odor.
  • Retains all natural, auburn color throughout the season and brightens up after a rainfall.
  • Less erosion from slopes and banks during rainfall.
  • Minimizes occurrence of molds, fungus, insects and rodents.
  • Retains essential moisture without becoming soggy or muddy.

An independent study at Texas A&M University by the Educational programs of Texas Cooperative Extension found a variety of pine straw mulch physical properties give it advantages over other organic mulches:

  • Stability – Pine needles interlock and hold together during hard rains, heavy winds, and even on landscapes with considerable slope.
  • Porosity – Pine straw remains loose and friable and does not form a top crust like grass clippings, leaves, and some wood mulches.
  • Weed Control – Pine straw mulch greatly reduces weed control efforts as wood mulches have a higher tendency to import weed seed in an ideal seedbed for germination.
  • Visual Appeal – The fine texture and uniform color of pine straw is simply more aesthetically pleasing to some users. Added annually, it gives landscapes a fresh clean and renewed appearance.
  • Longevity- Pine straw breaks down more slowly than wood mulch, so it needs to be re-applied less often or in less thickness after initial application.
  • Lightweight – Pine straw is easily handled because of its lightweight.

 

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Spring is Here


Spring is Here – Partial Content By: Julie Day of Danny Lipford.com

As the world outside finally begins to turn green after a long winter, it’s time once again to pay attention to your lawn. Spring is a sensitive time for your yard – the soil is spongy, the plants are tender, and the weather is unpredictable. Your lawn will thank you for being gentle this time of year, but it will also thank you for addressing a few important spring tasks. Here’s how to go about taking care of your lawn in the spring.

Types of Grass

Spring lawn care depends on the type of grass you are growing:

Cool-season grasses include fescue, bluegrass, and rye. They have two growth spurts – a moderate one in the spring, and a big one in the fall. They go dormant and can struggle in hot summer months, so the focus of spring care is strengthening the plants for summer. Warm-season grasses—such as Zoysia, St. Augustine, centipede, and Bermuda—thrive in the heat and go dormant during winter. They begin growing after the last spring frost and really get going by midsummer. Understanding the type of grass you have and its peak growing season will help you address lawn care tasks at the correct time.

Clean Up – Gently!

Avoid heavy yard work in the spring until the soil dries out – foot traffic and hard raking can compact or disturb soggy soil and damage tender, new grass shoots. Once the soil is good and dry, give your lawn a good spring cleaning to encourage grass growth and discourage pests and diseases. Remove leaves and fallen debris, and gently rake to fluff up and separate the grass shoots.

In areas with heavy snowfall, leftover snow piles can smother the grass underneath and foster mold growth. As the weather warms, spread snow piles out with a shovel to encourage melting.

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Fertilzing


Fertilizing your lawn is another key to maintaining the brilliant greens of a well-nourished lawn. The three major nutrients that are the key to green are nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K).

All three nutrients are essential in lawn care because they

  • enhance color
  • promote quick roots and seeding
  • improve winter hardiness
  • reduce the risk of disease

Give us a call and we will be happy to work with you on getting your lawn looking its best.

 

 

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When to fertilize your lawn


There’s no doubt that lawns need fertilizer, but it’s easy to make mistakes, like applying the wrong nutrients or fertilizing at the wrong time. If you fertilize your lawn when it doesn’t need it, you’re essentially throwing money away, so it’s essential to apply fertilizers at the right time, and use no more than necessary.

The last thing your lawn needs is constant overfeeding. It does nothing to benefit your turf grass, and can be damaging to the environment. For most lawns, applying fertilizer once or twice a year is enough to keep your grass green and healthy. Precisely when you apply fertilizer depends partly on your climate, but mostly on the type of grass you have. The key is to fertilize during the season when your grass is doing the most growing.

Warm season grasses including varieties like Bermuda grass, St. Augustine, zoysia, centipede and buffalo grass, warm-season grasses go partially dormant in winter, doing most of their growing during the summer. Warm-season grasses should be fertilized in early summer so they have plenty of nutrients for their active period. If necessary, they can be fertilized again in August.

It is also important to choose the right day. The best time to fertilize is the day after a hard rain or a significant watering. Check the weather forecast and avoid applying fertilizer right before a rainstorm, as a heavy downpour can cause many of the nutrients to leach out of the soil before the grass can use them. For best results, use a slow-release fertilizer, which provides better nutrition in the long run. After applying fertilizer, gently water your lawn just enough to wash the fertilizer off the leaves and into the soil.

As always, give us a call and we will help coordinate getting all of this done for you. The right way and at the right price.

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Height Does Matter


Proper mowing is one of the most important practices in keeping your lawn healthy. Grasses are like most plants — if you clip off the growing points (for grass, it’s in the crown, where the new leaves develop), the plants branch out and become denser, which in this case, turns thousands of individual grass plants into a tightly woven turf or a lawn. If you didn’t mow at all, your yard would look more like a prairie than a lawn. But the mere act of mowing isn’t what makes a lawn look good. Mowing height and mowing frequency determine how healthy and attractive your lawn looks.

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Summer Watering Tips


After the spring growing season, summer brings quite a bit of stress to lawn grasses. Not only are the heat and drought damaging, but we aren’t as forgiving in the summer as we are in the winter. We want our lawns lush and green for outdoor activities, and we try to fight nature by continuing to fertilize, water, and coax new growth out of our lawns no matter what the weather. However, by understanding and respecting the seasonal changes of turf grasses, you can take steps to care gently for your lawn as the mercury rises.

  • Cool-season grasses (fescue, bluegrass, and rye) grow best when temperatures are in the 60s F.
  • Warm-season grasses (St. Augustine, Centipede, and Bermuda) like temperatures in the 70s.

Once temperatures get into the 80s and above, lawns will begin to struggle a little, with cool-season grasses having the hardest time. Growth will slow, color may fade, and lawns will show signs of wear and tear as they are less able to recover from stress and traffic. Some cool-season lawns will even go dormant in the summer, looking brown and brittle until early fall.

Water Wisely

  • Lawns need at least one inch of water per week, and more when the heat is severe. Use a rain gauge or straight-sided can to keep track of the amount of water received from rainfall and irrigation.
  • Water deeply and less frequently to encourage drought-tolerant roots.
  • Water early in the day to reduce evaporation and fungal growth.
  • Either water your lawn regularly and deeply, or don’t water at all. Don’t let your lawn go brown and dormant, then try to “water it back to life.” If your lawn goes dormant in summer, it should stay that way until fall – don’t worry, it should recover once the weather changes.

sprinkler-watering-grass

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Our new Isuzu Truck Wrap


Do It Right Lawn Care has been in business for many years in the Dothan, AL.  We strive to better our work and our image everyday.  We contacted 509 Media to have them wrap our Isuzu truck with graphics to represent our company effectively.  After talking with 509 Media a plan was made and set in action.  The graphics on our lawn care truck will soon carry from the truck and website to our business cards, yard signs, and other advertising efforts.  Check out the truck and the graphics we added to advertise Do It Right Lawn Care around Dothan, AL.  We will be adding pictures of the tailgate wrap 509 Media is working on for our Dodge Truck soon.

You can find more pictures and information on our lawn care company wrap by visiting 509 Media.  Do It Right Lawn Care Truck Wrap

If you see us around town be sure to stop us for a quote on your lawn care needs.

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